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Indiana Hunting

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Written by:  Devn Schumacher 

May, 10 2021

Hunting in Indiana revolves around the common game animals like deer, squirrel, and turkeys. There are also opportunities to hunt small and woodland games in the state. Predators and furbearers in Indiana include raccoons, coyotes, and foxes.

Furthermore, hunting is very favorable in Illinois because there are many programs that hunters can benefit from. Examples of such programs are the Hunters Helping Farmers Program that links hunters up with private landowners who want to get rid of antlerless deer on their lands. Hunters can apply for this program with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

Indiana Hunting Regulations

Hunting in Indiana is well regulated with laws, and requirements for all hunters. Violation of hunting regulations in Indiana could lead to severe repercussions. This is why hunters in the state are advised to keep to all laws at all times.

Some of the most important hunting regulations in Indiana include the following:

Lawful Hunting Hours in Indiana

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources defines hunting hours for various games and wildlife in the state. They including the following

Turkeys Hunting Hours

Hunting hour for turkeys is one hour and thirty minutes before sunrise till sunsets. Hunters should know that turkey hunting hours can vary in different hunting lands in the state.

Deer Hunting Hours

Hunting hours for deer are one hour and thirty minutes before sunrise, to one hour and thirty minutes after sunsets.

Waterfowls Hunting Hours

These are the hunting hours for games like ducks and geese. It is one hour and thirty minutes before sunrise, until sunset. This may be different in various public hunting lands in Indiana.

For small games in Indiana, there are no defined hunting hours, However, there is an exception for rabbits on some Indiana DNR hunting properties.

There are no hunting or trapping hours for furbearers in the state.

Indiana Regulations for Wildlife Found Dead

For game animals or wildlife found dead in Indiana after being hit by a motor, a conservation officer, law enforcement officer, or any official of the Indiana DNR can give any individual permission to possess the dead animal.

For game animals that die from another cause, a conservation officer or anybody that he or she designates can issue a possession permit.

However, wildlife and game animals that are found dead from unknown causes must be duly reported to the Indiana DNR.

Disturbance of Wildlife Homes

It is a prohibition for any hunter in Indiana to disturb wildlife and game animals in their homes, and this includes dens, holes, burrow nests, etc. Disturbance, as defined by these regulations, can be, but not limited to any of the following activities;

  • Shooting
  • Pursuing
  • Digging
  • Cutting
  • Chipping
  • Use of chemicals
  • Use of smoke
  • Use of fire
  • Use of ferrets or any small game to drive out big games

Although the use of mechanical devices to disturb games in their homes is also prohibited, there is an exception to traps that are legally set. It is a prohibition to introduce other mechanical devices into game homes or anywhere they are sheltered.

It is also a prohibition to wear any type of device that aids in the climbing of trees and poles. You also may not make use of equipment like axes and saws to remove game animals from their hidden places due to protection reasons.

Trespassing Regulation

It is a prohibition to trespass on private properties while hunting, trapping, or pursuing a game. Exceptions are made for landowners and hunters that seek permission from landowners before hunting on a property.

For private properties, hunters must always request permission, and Indiana provides private land permission-seeking forms on their website.

Using Drones to Hunt

Indiana prohibits the use of any aerial vehicle that is not manned, to locate, search, detect, and scout game animals in a bid to take the animals for hunting, for at least 2 weeks before the hunting season of that specific game animal.

However, the use of drones can be allowed in Indiana for reasons such as wildlife control, research purposes, and agricultural production.

For the purpose of this regulation, aerial vehicle that is unmanned means the following:

  • The vehicle is without a physical human operator
  • The vehicle can fly with the aid of remote control or other automated programming methods.

Spotlighting While Hunting

It is a prohibition for hunters in Indiana to use a spotlight or any form of artificial light from vehicles when they are in possession of hunting weapons such as firearms and archery equipment.

Furthermore, it is a prohibition to make use of a spotlight, artificial light, or any other type of searchlight to hunt, attempt to hunt, or aid in the hunting of game animals. An exception to this regulation is made for fur-bearing games, and other aquatic lives like frogs and crayfish while fishing in Indiana waterbodies.

However, the use of red dot sights is allowed for hunting in the state.

Hunting with a Vehicle

It is a prohibition to pursue or hunt mammals and bird games in Indiana with any vehicle that is motor driven, and this includes motorboats.

Exceptions are made to this regulation for the following reasons:

  • Hunters with disable hunting permits are allowed to take game animals from an immobile vehicle.
  • Use of vehicles to assess traps that are lawfully set in hunting lands.
  • The use of motorboats that are beached to take games like waterfowls. This means that the motorboat must be immobile, motionless, or resting at anchor.

It is also a prohibition to drive an off-road vehicle that contains loaded firearms. Exceptions are allowed if :

  • The firearms are possessed legally
  • The owner of the vehicle is on a property owned personally
  • The owner of the vehicle has permission from a landowner to possess firearms on private property.

Hunter’s Dressing Requirements

Hunters are required to meet the fluorescent orange dressing requirement when hunting certain games in Indiana. The orange requirement should be one or more outer garment clothing like caps, overalls, coats, hats, jackets, etc. The state also allows minimal patches of the color requirement.

However, wearing camouflage decorated garments does not meet these requirements. Some of the game season where hunters need the orange dressing requirement include:

  • Turkey
  • Pheasant
  • Deer
  • Quail
  • Rabbit
  • Squirrel

Indiana Hunting License, Permits, and Tags.

Indiana issues different types of licenses, stamps, permits, and tags for residents and non-residents in the state. The license categories are usually based on age grade and type of games.

Indiana licenses, permits, and tags include the following:

Youth Licenses

Youth licenses issued in the state are:

Residents Youth Consolidated License for Hunting and Trapping

This license is available to youth residents of Indiana for hunting and trapping in the state. The license has an apprentice option. It costs $7.

Non Residents Annual Youth Hunting License

This license is available for non-residents youths that want to hunt in Indiana. It is valid for one year and has an apprentice option. It costs $17.

Non Residents Youth Deer Hunting License

This license is available for non-residents for only deer hunting in Indiana. It has an apprentice option and costs $25.

Non-Residents Deer License Bundle

This license is available for non-residents for only deer hunting in Indiana. It has an apprentice option and costs $65.

Non Residents Youth Spring Turkey Hunting

This license is available for non-residents youths for only spring season turkey hunting in Indiana. It has an apprentice option and costs $25.

Non Residents Youth Fall Turkey Hunting

This license is available for non-residents youths for only fall season turkey hunting in Indiana. It has an apprentice option and costs $25.

Non-Residents Annual Youth Trapping

This license is available for non-residents youths to set traps for game animals in Indiana. It is valid for one year and has an apprentice option. It costs $17.

Turkey Hunting Licenses

The types of turkey hunting licenses available in Indiana include the following:

Spring Turkey Hunting License

This license allows holders to hunt turkeys in the spring season. It is available for both residents and non-resident hunters at costs of $25 and $120 respectively. Options are available for apprentice hunters at the same cost.

Fall Turkey Hunting Licenses.

This license allows holders to hunt turkeys in the spring season. It is available for both residents and non-resident hunters at costs of $25 and $120 respectively. Options are available for apprentice hunters at the same costs.

Hunting Stamps

Hunting stamps in Indiana include the following:

Game Bird Habitat Stamp

This stamp will allow holders to take game birds in Indiana. It is available for residents and non-residents at the cost of $6.75. There are no options available for apprentice hunters.

Waterfowl Stamp

This stamp will allow holders to take waterfowls in Indiana. It is available for residents and non-residents at the cost of $6.75. There are no options available for apprentice hunters.

Indiana Hunting and Fishing Licenses

The licenses under the category allow holders to partake in Indiana hunting and fishing

Annual Hunting and Fishing License

Holders of this license can hunt and fish in Indiana. It is available for only residents of the state, has an apprentice option, and costs $25.

Hunting and Fishing License for Disabled American Veterans

This license is available for only residents of Indiana that are disabled veterans. There is no apprentice option for this type of license, and based on the validity period, it comes in 2 types, The annual license and the one valid for 10 years. The annual license costs $2.75, while the one valid for 10 years’ costs $27.5.

Small Games Hunting License

The licenses under this category allow hunters to take small games in the state. They include the following:

Annual Hunting Licenses

This license is valid for one year and comes with an apprentice option. It is available for residents and non-residents and costs $17 and $80 respectively.

Five Days Hunting License

This license is only available for non-residents in Indiana. It has an apprentice option, is valid for 5 days, and costs $31.

Annual Trapping Licenses

To trap wildlife and games in Indiana, you need to obtain a state valid trapping license that is valid for one year. There are no apprentice options for this license. It is available for residents and non-residents, and it costs $17 and $140 respectively.

Indiana Fishing Licenses, and Tags.

The types of fishing licenses, permits, and tags in Indiana include the following:

Annual Fishing License

This license allows holders to partake in Indiana fishing activities for the duration of one year. It is available for residents and non-residents at costs of $17 and $35 respectively. There are no options available for apprentices.

One Day Fishing License

This license is valid for just one day. Holders will be able to harvest fish species like salmon and trout within the 24 hours’ period. It is valid for residents and non-residents at a cost of $9. There are no options available for apprentices.

Seven Days Fishing License

This license is only valid for 7 days and is available for only non-residents that want to fish in Indiana. It costs $20, and there are no options available for apprentices.

Annual Fishing License for Seniors

This license is only available for senior residents of Indiana that are 65 years or older. The license makes it possible to harvest trout and salmon species, and it is valid for a year. It costs $3, and there are no options available for apprentices.

Lifetime Annual Fishing License for Seniors

This license is only available for senior residents of Indiana that are 65 years or older. The license makes it possible to harvest trout and salmon species, and it will be valid throughout the holder’s lifetime. It costs $17, and there are no options available for apprentices.

Trout and Salmon Fishing Stamps

Anybody that wants to harvest species like salmon and trout in Indiana will need a stamp issued for them. Exceptions are made for fishers that already own licenses that allow them to fish salmon and trout for a specific period. It is available for residents and non-residents and costs $11. There are no options available for apprentices.

Annual Hunting and Fishing License

This license allows holders to take part in both hunting and fishing in Indiana. It is available for only residents of the state at a cost of $25. There is also an Indiana apprentice hunting license at the same cost.

Indiana Hunting Season

Hunting season in Indiana is defined by the type of games and the weapons used to take the games.

The 2020/21 hunting season for various wildlife in Indiana includes the following:

Indiana Deer Hunting Season

  • Reduction Zone Hunting Season (15th of September to 31st of January)
  • Youth Hunting Season (26th of September to 27th of September)
  • Archery Season (1st of October to 3rd of January)
  • Firearms Season (14th of November to 29th of November)
  • Muzzleloader Season (5th of December to 20th of December)
  • Antlerless Season (16th of December to 3rd of January)

Bag limits for deer hunting in Indiana are not the same for all hunting regions in the state. Therefore, hunters are required to learn about the deer limit for their own Indiana hunting zone.

Indiana Turkey Hunting Season

  • Fall Firearms Season (21st of October to 1st of November)
  • Fall Archery Season (1st of October to 1st of November and 5th of December to 3rd of January)
  • Spring General Hunting Season (21st of April to 9th of May)
  • Spring Youth Season (17th of April to 18th of April)

Indiana Small Games Hunting Season

  • Gray Squirrel and Fox Squirrel Hunting Season (15th of August to 31st of January)
  • Pheasant Hunting Season (1st of November to 15th of November)
  • Quail Hunting Season (1st of November to 10th of January)
  • Rabbit Hunting Season (1st of November to 28th of February)
  • Crow Hunting Season (1st of July to 15th of August and 13th of December to 1st of March)
  • Green Frog and Bullfrog Hunting Season (15th of June to 30th of April)
  • Eastern Snapping Turtle Season (1st of July to 31st of March)

For hunting in Indiana, bag limits, special hunting seasons, and hunting requirements, laws, and regulations are based on the game animals. Licensed hunters must gain all possible knowledge they can about the specific game they are hunting.

Indians Wildlife, Games and Fish

Games and wildlife available for hunting in Indiana include the following:

Indiana Deer Hunting

Deer hunting in Indiana is possible because of the various acres of land and forests in the state. Indiana has national and state land areas that afford hunters the opportunity to hunt deer in abundance. Deer are widely distributed in the state and you can find them in the forests of most counties. However, one area of the state that is notable for deer hunting is the Harrison Crawford forest.

Indiana Turkey Hunting

Turkey hunting in Indiana takes place in all counties. They are quite abundant in the state. They even get more plentiful in the spring period, and for every square mile, you can find as many as 4 turkeys. Wild turkey harvest is usually more in the southern part of Indiana. But only a few counties like LA Porte, St. Joseph, Starke, and Marshall have a great population of wild turkeys in the northern part of Indiana.

Indiana Fox Hunting

The most common fox species in Indiana are the red foxes and they love to inhabit scrubs and woodland regions of the state. They can be found on pastures, agricultural lands, forested areas, and brushlands. They are also comfortable in urban and suburban parts of the state. Fox hunting in Indiana takes place in all counties of the state.

Indiana Bobcat Hunting

Bobcats are the only species of wildcats that can be found in Indiana. Their population is more in the southern and central part of the state, but increases in the northern region. They are smart and careful games because they blend well with their immediate environment and are quiet animals.

Indiana Coyote Hunting

Coyote hunting in Indiana takes place mostly in the winter period when they are in their element. They are evenly dispersed in all regions of the state and even in very urbanized areas like South Bend, Indianapolis, and Fort Wayne.

Indiana Quail Hunting

The quail species associated with Indiana is the Northern Bobwhite Quail that are common to all eastern states in the nation. They inhabit agricultural landscape areas of the state.

Indiana Ducks Hunting

Duck hunting in Indiana takes place in wetland areas of the state away from human habitation. They are available in the state’s wildlife refuges, and they inhabit shallow parts of water bodies like ponds and lakes.

Indiana Raccoons Hunting

Raccoons in Indiana are found in all parts of the state. They inhabit shallow areas of water bodies, agricultural croplands, and woodland areas. However, they occur in their greatest population in the northeast part of Indiana, especially in the glacial lakes. Also, farmlands found in the central part of the state are also known for raccoon hunting in Indiana.

Indiana Hunting Shooting Ranges

Some of the shooting ranges available for the general public in Indiana include the following:

  • Atterbury Fish & Wildlife
  • Crooked Creek Conservation & Gun Club
  • Eagle Creek Park Pistol Range
  • Five Points Conservation Club
  • Five Points Conservation Club
  • Frontier Gun Club
  • Glen Park Izaak Walton
  • Fulton County Conservation Club
  • Griffith Izaak Walton League of America
  • Glen Park Izaak Walton
  • Hillside Shooting Sports
  • Indian Creek Shooting Center

Indiana Hunting Lands for Sale and Lease

Hunting lands for sale in Indiana include the following:

  • Covington, Indiana (Fountain County) 164 acres.
  • Columbus, Indiana (Brown County) 250 acres.
  • Montgomery, Indiana (Daviess County) 8 acres.
  • Campbellsburg, Indiana (Washington County) 95 acres.
  • Shoals, Indiana (Martin County) 400 acres.
  • Auburn, Indiana (DeKalb County) 4.75 acres.
  • Cloverdale, Indiana (Owen County) 126 acres.

Hunting lands for lease in Indiana include the following:

  • Deer & Turkey Hunting Property Available in Medora, Indiana (Jackson County) 10,000 acres.
  • High Fence Trophy Whitetail Hunting Available in Indiana (Whitley County) 600 acres.
  • Whitetail deer and turkey woods (Noble county) 40 acres.
  • Hunting and Camping Oasis Near Indianapolis (Marion County) 9 acres.
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