Mississippi Hunting

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Written by:  Devn Schumacher 

May, 10 2021

Even though some of the hunting options available in Mississippi are not up to standard, the state still has great games to hunt such as turkeys, deer, and small game animals. It is also one of the states in the US where hunters can take alligators.

Mississippi Hunting Regulations

Like most states in the USA, Mississippi has hunting regulations, laws, and requirements that hunters must abide by.

Hunting as defined by this regulation refers to the taking, trapping, pursuing, searching, shooting, stalking, killing, and snaring of wildlife, games, and fishes that are protected by the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources. It also does not matter if the game is killed or injured during the activity.

Some of the most important Mississippi hunting regulations include the following:

Hunting Accidents

If you are involved in any form of hunting accident with the use of a firearm, and the accidents lead to a personal injury or the damage of a property that is worth more than $100, you are obligated to report the accident within the next 12 hours that it occurred.

The accident must be reported to the sheriff's office of the local county it occurred, or to any local conservation office. If the sheriff’s office and the local conservation office are not available, then you have to report to the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources if the accident occurs between the hours of 8 am to 4:30 pm.

Requesting License

Hunters must have their valid Mississippi hunting license with them on public or private hunting lands. Upon request, you are obligated to show the license or any valid permit, tag, and stamp to peace officers and landowners that are in charge of the property where you are trapping or hunting. The license can either be in physical or electronic form.

Possession and Storage of Game Animals

For the possession of games or fur-bearing animals that you obtain legally with a valid license while hunting in Mississippi, you may not exceed the bag limit of that specific game until the first day of the next open season of the game.

For deer hunting in Mississippi, you are allowed to possess about 25 pounds of deer meat known as venison, as long as the animal is taken legally.

Use of Communication Devices

It is a prohibition to make use of a 2-way communication device to direct hunters, stalk, or locate the movement and position of game animals. There is an exception for coyote hunting where hunters are allowed to make use of 2-way radios. Also, falconers that have a valid state falconer permit are allowed to use a one-way mobile transmitter to capture free-flying birds. If you are making use of a hunting dog, you can use a one-way mobile transmitter to either track or recover the dog.

Imported Games

You can legally possess games that were lawfully taken from other states and lawfully imported into Mississippi only if you can prove that it was legally taken and legally imported. However, there are some exceptions to this regulation for big games.

Retrieving and Wasting Games

It is a prohibition to leave game animals that you injured while trying to hunt them without making any effort to retrieve them. In the same vein, it is a prohibition to abandon any usable portion of game animals after taking them. Usable portion as defined by this regulation refers to:

  • The part of a game animal that is usually processed for food.
  • The fur and hide of fur-bearing games.

Transportation of Hunting Firearms

It is a prohibition for you to possess or carry a firearm in your vehicle on Mississippi public highways. Exceptions to this regulation are made for firearms that are contained in their case, and those with magazines and ammunition unattached. Also, the transportation of handguns must be in a closed container, and the handgun must remain unloaded. The handgun should also be inaccessible to anyone in the vehicle.

For muzzleloaders, they must either be cased or unloaded. Muzzleloaders are considered unloaded when the priming charge is not in the pan or if the cap is not in the nipple.

Hunting Near Buildings

It is a prohibition to discharge or attempt to discharge a firearm for hunting game animals when you are within 200 yards of a residential building or a building that contains feedlots and domestic livestock.

Exceptions are allowed for this regulation if you get the permission of the landowner or tenant living in the residential building.

Feedlot according to this regulation refers to a building for the confinement of livestock where they are fed until they reach slaughter size.

Open Carry While Hunting In Mississippi.

You can open carry with your firearm while hunting in the state, and this does not exclude bow hunting.

However, to conceal carry while hunting in Mississippi, you must own a state permit.

Mississippi has hunter harassment laws in the state to protect hunting activities, and they include the following:

  • Nobody shall deliberately interfere with a licensed hunting activity in the state or the legal taking of games in wildlife.
  • Nobody shall disturb animals in the wild in such a way that will affect the animal’s behaviors, making it difficult for legal hunting activities to take place.
  • Nobody shall disturb or harass anybody who is taking part in the legal hunting of wildlife in Mississippi.
  • Nobody shall trespass on private or state-owned property to carry out hunting activity without permission from the owner of the property or the authority in charge.

Mississippi Hunting License, Permits, and Tags.

Hunting licenses in Mississippi are issued based on residency and age of the applicant. Permits, tags, and stamps on the other hand are purchased for specific games in the state.

Some of the most important hunting license, permits, and tags, in Mississippi include the following:

Residents License and Permits

These licenses and permits are only available to residents of Mississippi. They include the following:

Sportsman License

This license comes with turkey hunting in the fall and spring season, use of hunting weapons and archery, and fishing in Mississippi freshwater. Residents that possess this license can take part in all of the aforementioned activities. However, the license does not include a permit to Wildlife Management Areas, or saltwater fishing in Mississippi. It costs $45.

All Game Hunting and Fishing License

This license comes with access to turkeys hunting in the spring season but does not include a permit to Wildlife Management Areas, or saltwater fishing in Mississippi. It costs $25.

Archery, Crossbow and Primitive Hunting Weapons Permits

These permits allow residents to make use of archery, primitive weapons, and crossbows in various Mississippi hunting seasons. It costs $14.

Wildlife Management Area Permits

Provide access for resident hunters to take games in Mississippi WMAs. Hunters must purchase this permit before they take or attempt to take the game in any of the state WMA. It costs $15.

Small Game Hunting and Freshwater Fishing License

This license allows resident hunters in Mississippi to take small game animals and harvest fishes in freshwater. It costs $10.

Apprentice Sportsman License

Resident hunters that are yet to complete the required hunter certification course will need an apprentice license to hunt under the supervision of a licensed hunter in the state. The license has the benefits of the regular residents’ sportsman license. It costs $32.

Apprentice All Games License

This license is just like the regular All games and fishing license, but it is only available to apprentice hunters that are yet to complete the hunter certification course. Apprentice hunters will only be able to hunt under the supervision of licensed hunters in Mississippi. The cost for this license is $17.

Apprentice Small Game License

This license is just like the regular Residents Small Games license, but it is only available to apprentice hunters that are yet to complete the hunter certification course. Apprentice hunters will only be able to hunt under the supervision of licensed hunters in Mississippi. The cost for this license is $13.

3 Days Sportsman Apprentice License

Resident hunters that are yet to complete the required hunter certification course will need an apprentice license to hunt under the supervision of a licensed hunter in the state. The license has the benefits of the regular residents’ sportsman license, and it is only valid for 3 days. It costs $32.

Trapping License

Mississippi residents' trapping license will allow holders to set traps in legal hunting lands in the state. It costs $25.

Non-residents Hunting Licenses

These are Mississippi out-of-state hunting licenses for non-resident hunters. They include the following:

Non-residents All Games Hunting License

This license allows non-residents to hunt all games in Mississippi. It does not include access to turkeys hunting in the spring season, a permit to Wildlife Management Areas, or saltwater fishing in Mississippi. It costs $300.

7 Days Non-residents All Games Hunting License

This license allows non-residents to hunt all games in Mississippi. It does not include access to turkeys hunting in the spring season, a permit to Wildlife Management Areas, or saltwater fishing in Mississippi. It is only valid for 7 days and costs $125.

3 Days Non-residents All Games Hunting License

This license allows non-residents to hunt all games in Mississippi. It does not include access to turkeys hunting in the spring season, a permit to Wildlife Management Areas, or saltwater fishing in Mississippi. It is only valid for 3 days and costs $125.

Youth All Game Hunting License

This license allows non-resident youths to hunt all games in Mississippi. It does not include access to turkeys hunting in the spring season, a permit to Wildlife Management Areas, or saltwater fishing in Mississippi. It costs $110.

7 Days Youth All Game Hunting License

This license allows non-resident youths to hunt all games in Mississippi. It does not include access to turkeys hunting in the spring season, a permit to Wildlife Management Areas, or saltwater fishing in Mississippi. It is only valid for 7 days and costs $75.

Wildlife Management Area Permits

Provide access for non-resident hunters to take games in Mississippi WMAs. Hunters must purchase this permit before they take or attempt to take the game in any of the state WMA. It costs $30.

Mississippi Fishing, Licenses, Permits, and Tags

Fishing licenses, permits, and tags available in Mississippi include the following:

Residents Fishing Licenses

These are only available to residents of Mississippi, and they include the following:

3 Days Freshwater Fishing License

This license will allow residents of Mississippi to harvest fishes in freshwaters. The license is valid for 3 days, and it costs $3.

Saltwater Fishing License

This license will allow residents of Mississippi to harvest fishes in saltwater bodies in the state. It costs $10.

Senior Lifetime Saltwater Fishing License

This license is available for only senior residents of Mississippi that are 65 years old or more. It costs $5.

Non-residents Fishing Licenses

Only non-residents that want to harvest fishes in Mississippi can apply for these licenses. They include the following:

Armed Forces 14 Days Fishing and Hunting Licenses

This license is valid for non-residents that are members of the US armed forces. It costs $33.

3 Days Freshwater Fishing License

This license will allow non-residents to harvest fishes in freshwaters. It is valid for 3 days and costs $15.

Freshwater Fishing License

This is a non-resident regular fishing license to harvest fishes in Mississippi freshwaters. It costs $60.

1 Day Freshwater Fishing License

This license will allow non-residents to harvest fishes in freshwaters. It is valid for 1 day and costs $8.

Saltwater Fishing License

This is a non-resident regular fishing license to harvest fishes in Mississippi saltwater. It costs $30.

3 Days Saltwater Fishing License

This license will allow non-residents to harvest fishes in saltwater. It is valid for 3 days and costs $15.

Mississippi Hunting Season

Hunting seasons in Mississippi are based on the game animals, and mostly the type of hunting weapon or firearm used for taking the game.

The 2020/21 hunting season for various wildlife in Minnesota includes the following:

Mississippi Alligator Hunting Season

  • General Hunting Season (Hunting in Public Waters: 28th of August to 7th of September. Hunting in Private Lands: 39th of August to 21st of September)

Alligator hunting in Mississippi is according to special permits issued by the state. Hunters can apply for the permit online via the Mississippi Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks website. There will be a lottery system to choose hunters that are drawn, and they will also have to undergo a compulsory alligator hunting training requirement. Hunters that are exempted from this training must have completed the course previously. The minimum age required to apply for alligator hunting in Mississippi is 16 years old.

Mississippi Deer Hunting Season

  • Archery Hunting Season (1st of October to 20th of November)
  • Youth Gun Hunting Season (7th of November to 20th of November and 21st of November to 31st of January)
  • Firearms Hunting Season (21st of November to 20th of January)
  • Primitive Weapon Hunting Season (Antlerless: 9th of November to 20th of November. Others: 21st of January to 15th of February)

Deer hunting in Mississippi varies for various hunting zones, and this applies to the use of hunting dogs too. For deer hunting, there are 3 Mississippi hunting zones, namely: Western Mississippi, middle Mississippi, and Southeast. Each of the hunting zones will have its own specific date for deer hunting. Hunters are advised to visit the state wildlife, fishery, and park website for more information about this.

Mississippi Turkey Hunting Season

  • Fall General Hunting Season (15th of October to 15th of November)
  • Youth Spring Hunting Season (8th of March to 14th of March)
  • General Spring Hunting Season (15th of March to 1st of May)

Fall turkey open season for private lands in Mississippi will only be allowed for hunters that have the required permit.

Mississippi Small Games Hunting Season

  • Rabbits Hunting Season (17th of October to 28th of February)
  • Bobwhite Quail Hunting Season (26th of November to 6th of March)
  • Raccoon Hunting Season (1st of July to 30th of September)
  • Opossum Hunting Season (1st of October to 31st of October and 1st of November to 28th of February)
  • Fall Squirrel Open Season (1st of October to 28th of February)
  • Spring Squirrel Season (15th of May to 1st of June)
  • Youth Squirrel Season (24th of September to 30th of September)

Hunters should know that special hunting seasons, bag limits, and hunting laws and regulations usually vary based on game animals and their specific season. For more information, hunters are advised to visit Mississippi Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks website.

Mississippi Wildlife, Games, and Fishes

Some of the most common games and wildlife hunted in Mississippi include the following:

Mississippi Deer Hunting

Deer are common in counties close to the Mississippi River. They inhabit the most fertile land areas, and the fertility level of land will usually determine the quality of deer you can find on that land. Since some of the most fertile lands in Mississippi are found in the delta and batture areas, you will find abundant deer in these regions.

Mississippi Alligator Hunting

Alligators are well dispersed in Mississippi, and you can find a lot of them in counties such as Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson. Alligator's presence is also recorded as far as the northern part of Mississippi, especially in Coahoma and Tunica counties.

Mississippi Duck Hunting

The best places for duck hunting in Mississippi are in wetland habitats, especially the ones that are not close to human habitation. Wildlife refuge areas with lakes, rivers, and ponds will be ideal for duck hunting. Ducks are mostly found in shallow areas of water bodies in the state.

Mississippi Turkey Hunting

The most common wild turkey in Mississippi is the eastern wild turkey found in almost every region of the state, but especially in the eastern part of the Mississippi River.

Mississippi Hog Hunting

Hog hunting in Mississippi is common because of its even distribution across all parts of the state. However, hunters have some hotspots for duck taking, especially in the southeast, southwest, and delta regions of Mississippi.

Mississippi Shooting Ranges for Hunting

Some of the shooting ranges in Mississippi open for public access in the state include the following:

  • Bar 3 Ranges
  • Bullz-I Shooting Range
  • DeSoto District Ranges, US Forest Servide
  • Gulfport Police Range
  • Hwy 583 Pistol & Rifle Range
  • Lake Gep Skeet Club
  • The Bullet Hole Indoor Range
  • Precision Shooting Center
  • Lloyd Eaton Firing Range

Mississippi Hunting Lands for Lease and Sale

Mississippi hunting lands for sale include the following:

  • Vicksburg, Mississippi (Warren County) 1,645 acres.
  • Natchez, Mississippi (Jefferson County) 510.38 acres.
  • Port Gibson, Mississippi (Claiborne County) 295 acres.
  • Louin, Mississippi (Smith County) 73 acres.
  • Soso, Mississippi (Jones County) 58 acres.
  • Falkner, Mississippi (Benton County) 164 acres.
  • Greenwood Springs, Mississippi (Monroe County) 86 acres.
  • Bentonia, Mississippi (Yazoo County) 352.5 acres.
  • Itta Bena, Mississippi (Leflore County) 177 acres.
  • Corinth, Mississippi (Alcorn County) 160 acres.
  • Raleigh, Mississippi (Smith County) 80 acres.
  • Fulton, Mississippi (Itawamba County) 568 acres.
  • Drew, Mississippi (Sunflower County) 35 acres.

Mississippi hunting lands for lease include the following:

  • Deer hunting spots available for sale in Choctaw County, 3000 acres.
  • Trophy hunters on mature hardwoods and planted pines in Jefferson County, 570 acres.
  • Hunting lease in Yalobusha County Looking for members, 900 acres.
  • Deer and turkey lease in Eupora, Webster County, 2000 acres.
  • Some spots open at Spring Hill Hunting Club for new members, Tippah County, 3,200 acres.
  • Hunting land for lease in Attala County, 140 acres.
  • Beautiful 10-acre property with a single-family home that could be used as a hunting house. Winston County, 10 acres.
  • Stennis Buffer Zone Deer Lease, Hancock County, 1,034 acres.
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