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Nevada Hunting

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Written by:  Admin SERP 

May, 10 2021

Nevada is a state for big game hunting. Some of the large animals you can expect to find are Elks, deer, antelope, deer, and bighorn sheep.

Nevada Hunting Regulations

Before you start hunting in Nevada, you must be aware of the state hunting laws, requirements and regulations:

Some of the most important Nevada hunting regulations and requirement include the following:

The Nevada Hunter Education Certificate

A hunter education certificate obtained in Nevada is evidence that you have the important knowledge to take games and wildlife in the state. The state requires that anyone born on or after 1949 must obtain a Hunter Education Certificate before hunting in the state. Also, there is no age requirement, mandated for the purchase of Hunter Education Certificate in Nevada.

Hunting Licenses Regulation

In Nevada, hunting licenses are not the same as the Hunter Education Certificate. Before you can hunt games and wildlife in the state, you must own a valid Nevada hunting license. There are various types of licenses available for residents and non-residents. Hunting Licenses in Nevada are usually categorized based on details like the type of game to be hunted, the age of the hunter and if the hunter is a resident of the state or not.

Game Tagging in Nevada

Nevada hunting regulations require that it is compulsory to tag specific game animals after hunting them. Some of these animals are deer, turkey, bears, and elks. Before you can hunt in Nevada, you must understand the state tagging requirement for the type of animals you are taking. To avoid violations of this regulation. Ensure that the animal is tagged properly.

Some of the tagging requirements for hunting in Nevada include the following:

  • You must put the tag on the animal carcass according to the hunting requirement provided. The tagging instruction, regulation, or requirement will depend on the type of game you are taking.
  • It is a violation of tagging regulation to attach a tag on an animal carcass prior to and during the transportation of the game with a vehicle, or when the animal carcass is placed in a storage capacity, or a campsite.
  • It is compulsory for the tag to carry important details such as the date for the animal taking, the signature of the hunter, and every other information needed for the specific game. It is a prohibition to sign a tag prior to hunting a game in Nevada.

Hunter Dressing in Nevada

Before you hunt in certain game seasons in Nevada, you are required to wear at least 500 square inches of either a pink or orange hunting overall. Some of the games and wildlife that this dressing is mandated for include pronghorn, beat, moose, elks and deer.

The pink or orange dress should be worn as an outer cloth and must be above the waist level. It should also be worn with a head cover of the same cloth color. The head cover could either be a cap or hat. Hunter dressing regulations also cover hunters that are talking games in muzzle loading, rifle and archery seasons.

Although there is an exception for archery hunters that are hunting on lands privately owned in Nevada, it is still recommended for them to do so. If you are hunting from either a pop-up blind or ground blip, it is compulsory to wear either an orange or pink clothing whenever you are not within the blind. The clothing color must be obvious, so it is a violation to wear camouflage pink or orange colors.

Nevada Bag Limit

There are also bag limit regulations in Nevada to limit the quantity of game that a hunter can take. Nevada bag limit can be based on either seasonal or daily hunting, depending on the game animal. If there is a daily bag limit for a game, it will restrict the number of that game species you can hunt in a day. Seasonal bag limit will limit the number of games you can take during the specific game hunting season.

Private Land Hunting

Most land areas in Nevada are privately owned. You are free to hunt without restriction in privately owned lands, and if you do not personally own the land, you can get the landowner’s permission to do so. However, privately owned lands are still under the Nevada hunting regulations, requirements and laws. Hunters on private lands must also adhere to any landowner regulation or requirement. Furthermore, hunters are required to respect all landowner property and rights.

Public Land Hunting

Public lands in Nevada exceed 23 million acres, and the state provides many public hunting prospects with these forested areas, parks and conservation areas. Aside from hunting, public lands in Nevada provide opportunities for activities like hiking, trapping, fishing and wildlife viewing. Some of the public lands managed by states will also have their own regulations and requirements that must be adhered to. Before hunting in these areas, it is your duty to know the regulations peculiar to that hunting area.

Hunting in Wildlife Areas

Nevada wildlife areas are public lands owned by the state and under the management of the state park and wildlife. Wildlife areas in Nevada are more than 300, and this amounts to millions of land areas in mountain regions, wetlands, forests, grassland, etc.

All these parts of the state will allow hunting and every other type of outdoor recreational activity.

Regulations for Hunting in Nevada Wildlife Areas

Aside from the state hunting regulations, there may be additional restrictions to hunt in Nevada wildlife areas or use them for recreation. Most of these wildlife management areas will post the regulations for hunters to see before hunting. Regulations will not be the same for all areas. Some common wildlife area regulations include the following:

  • Restriction on the type of firearm and the method for taking wildlife and games.
  • Restrictions and regulations on the use of dogs to hunt.
  • Restriction and regulation on the use and access to vehicles within the areas.
  • Extra requirements for license and permits.
  • Restriction on recreational activities and camping in the state.

Open Carry While Hunting.

Nevada gun law allows the possession of firearms while hunting and even in an archery season.

But while bow hunting, you can only make use of archery tools or muzzle firearms. Open carry here is for just self-defense; you cannot use the gun to take any animal.

Firearms for bow hunting must be less than eight inches long, and not have a telescopic sight.

Nevada Hunting License, Permits and Tags

Hunting licenses in Nevada are available based on the hunter’s residency, while permits and tags are issued for certain big animals.

Some of the common type of Residents and Non-residents licenses available in Nevada include the following:

Residents Licenses

These licenses are only available to residents of Nevada. They include the following:

Adult Hunting Combination License

This is a license required for resident hunters in Nevada that are 18 years or older. The license will allow holders to harvest fish too. It costs $75.

Youth Hunting Combination License

This license is available for youth hunters in Nevada that are between the ages of 12 and 17. The license will allow holders to harvest fish too. It costs $15.

Adult Hunting License

This is an ordinary hunting license available to adult residents that are 18 years old or more. It costs $38.

Apprentice Hunting License

Hunters that are at least 12 years old and are yet to complete the mandatory hunting course will need to purchase an apprentice license to hunt under the supervision of a licensed hunter in Nevada. It costs $15.

Senior Specialty Combination License

The license is available to senior residents of Nevada that are 65 years old or more and have lived in the state for at least 5 years. It allows them to harvest fish too. It costs $15.

Serviceman Specialty Combination

The license is available to members of the US Armed Forces in Nevada. It allows them to harvest fish too. It costs $15.

Severely Disabled Specialty Combination License

The license is available to verified disabled residents of Nevada. It allows them to harvest fish too. It costs $15.

Non-residents Hunting Licenses

These are out-of-state Nevada hunting licenses available for non-residents that want to take part in hunting activities in the state. They include the following:

Non-residents Adult Hunting Combination License

This is a license required for non-resident hunters in Nevada that are 18 years or older. The license will allow holders to harvest fishes too. It costs $155.

Non-residents Youth Hunting Combination Licenses

This license is available for youth hunters that are between the ages of 12 and 17 and are non-residents of Nevada. The license will allow holders to harvest fish too. It costs $15.

Non-residents Apprentice Hunting License

Non-resident hunters that are at least 12 years old are yet to complete the mandatory hunt requirement course and will need to purchase an apprentice license to hunt under the supervision of a licensed hunter in Nevada. It costs $15.

1 Day Combination Permit

This permit will allow non-residents to hunt and fish upland games and waterfowls. The age requirement to apply is 18 years and older. It costs $23.

Consecutive Day Hunting License

A consecutive day hunting license can be purchased by only non-residents that have the 1 Day combination permit. It costs $8.

Nevada Hunting Tags

Hunting tags available in Nevada include the following:

Deer Tags

Deer hunters must purchase tags ahead of Nevada deer hunting season. Deer tags are available for residents and non-residents at costs of $30 and $240 respectively.

Antelope Tags

Antelope hunters must purchase tags ahead of Nevada antelope hunting season. Antelope tags are available for residents and non-residents at costs of $60 and $300 respectively.

Black Bear Tags

Black bear hunters must purchase tags ahead of Nevada bear hunting season. Bear tags are available for residents and non-residents at costs of $100 and $300 respectively.

Bighorn Sheep Tags

Bighorn hunters must purchase tags ahead of Nevada Bighorn sheep hunting season. Bighorn Sheep tags are available for residents and non-residents at costs of $120 and $1,200 respectively.

Elk Tags

Elk hunters must purchase tags ahead of Nevada elk hunting season. All types of Elk tags are available for residents at a cost of $120. However, antlerless elk tags and antlered elk tags cost $500 and $1,200 respectively for non-residents.

Mountain Lion Tags

Mountain lions’ hunters must purchase tags ahead of Nevada mountain lion hunting season. The tags are available for residents and non-residents at costs of $29 and $104 respectively.

Nevada Fishing License, Permits and Tags

Fishing licenses, permits and tags available in Nevada include the following:

Residents Fishing License

This license is only available to residents of Nevada. They include the following:

Regular Fishing Licenses

This license is available for residents that want to harvest fishes in any Nevada waterbody. It is valid for a year from the date it was purchased. The age requirement for the license is 18 years and older. It costs $40

1 Day Fishing Permit

This license is available with residents to harvest fishes for just a day. It costs $9

Consecutive Day Permit

This permit is only valid for residents that need an additional day after purchasing the 1-day fishing license. It costs $3.

Non-Residents Fishing Licenses

These licenses are available for non-residents that want to harvest fishes in Nevada. They include the following:

Non-residents Fishing Licenses

This license is available for non-residents that want to harvest fishes in any Nevada waterbody. It is valid for a year from the date it was purchased. The age requirement for the license is 18 years and older. It costs $80.

Interstate Boundary Water License

This license is mandatory for non-residents that want to harvest fishes in reciprocal waterbodies and Nevada water boundaries such as Tahoe, Topaz, Mead and Mohave lakes. The license costs $30.

1 Day Fishing Permit

This license is available for non-residents to harvest fishes for just a day. It costs $18.

Consecutive Day Permit

This permit is only valid for non-residents that need an additional day after purchasing the 1-day fishing license. It costs $7.

  • NB: Combination licenses for hunting and fishing in Nevada are available for residents and non-residents. They are listed among the hunting licenses.

Nevada Hunting Seasons

Hunting season in Nevada varies for various game animals and the type of firearm used to take them.

The 2020/21 hunting season for various wildlife in Nevada includes the following:

Nevada Deer Hunting Season

  • Archery Hunting Season (1st of September to 31st of December)
  • November Firearm Hunting Season (14th of November to 22nds of November)
  • Muzzleloader Hunting Season (1st of December to 31st of December)
  • Late Antlerless Hunting Season (1st of January to 15th of January)

Nevada Antelope Hunting Seasons

  • Late Antlerless Season (1st of January to 15th of January)
  • Nevada Antelope Hunting Seasons
  • Archery Hunting Season (20th of August to 31st of December)
  • Muzzleloader Hunting Season (19th of September to 4th of October)
  • Firearms Hunting Season (10th of October to 25th of October)
  • November Late Does and Fawn Hunting Season (1st of November to 31st of January)

Nevada Elk Hunting Seasons

  • Archery Bull Hunting Season (1st of September to 31st of October)
  • Firearm Bull Hunting Season (21st of September to 31st of October)
  • Antlerless Hunting Season (1st of August to 1st of January)

Nevada Wild Turkey Hunting Seasons

  • Youth Fall Archery and Shotgun Season (15th of September to 31st of January)
  • Fall General Season (15th of September to 31st of January)

Nevada Bighorn Sheep Hunting Season

  • General Hunting Season (1st of December to 22nds of December)

Bighorn sheep hunting in Nevada is only available for hunters who have bighorn sheep permits. The permits are issued via lottery, and lucky hunters get to hunt the game just once in a lifetime. The permit is available for only residents of the state. There is an application fee of $25 to apply for the lottery, and this fee is non-refundable.

Nevada Small Games Hunting Seasons

  • Squirrels Hunting Seasons (1st of August to 31st of January)
  • Rabbit Hunting Season (1st of September to 28th of February)
  • Grouse Hunting Season (1st of December to 31st of January)
  • Pheasant Hunting Season (31st of October to 1st of January)
  • Quail Hunting Season (31st of October to 1st of January)
  • Partridge Hunting Season (31st of October to 1st of January)

For hunting in Nevada, the hunting laws and regulations, bag limits and other special hunting seasons will vary based on the game animal and the hunting regions. Hunters are advised to visit the Nevada Game and Parks Commission for more information about hunting in the state.

Nevada Wildlife, Games and Fishes.

Some of the games and wildlife available in Nevada include the following:

Nevada Mountain Lion Hunting

Mountain lion hunting in Nevada is common because of the abundance of deer in the state. They inhabit deserted regions, badlands, mountainous areas, and rain forests. Other places you can find mountain lions in Nevada are juniper and pinion pine.

Nevada Deer Hunting

Deer hunting in Nevada is common between resident and non-resident hunters. They are available in a lot of state WMA and Nevada public hunting lands. The most common deer species in Nevada is the Mule deer. They can be found in east and central Nevada that have a sufficient amount of rainfalls and favorable grazing vegetation.

Nevada Elk Hunting

Elks are one of the most plentiful big game animals in Nevada and this is why the Department of Wildlife issues hunting tags to keep track of their increasing numbers in the state.

Nevada Black Bear Hunting

The only types of bears that can be found in Nevada are the black bears. They inhabit mountainous and forested parts of the state. They are more abundant in the mountains found in the western part of the state such as the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Black bear hunting in Nevada takes place in many parts of the state.

Nevada Turkey Hunting

The introduction of Turkeys to Nevada started as far back as the 1960 by the Department of Wildlife. Today turkey hunting in Nevada takes place in a lot of lands and state WMAs. They inhabit shrubby and grassy areas of the state.

Nevada Bighorn Sheep Hunting

Bighorn sheep in Nevada inhabit mountains and deserts in the state. The ones in the desert are not as big as the rocky mountainous sheep, but they usually have broader horns. Bighorn sheep in the desert are hardy and can survive without water for a long time.

Nevada Chukar Hunting

Chukar hunting in Nevada takes place in a lot of WMA. But they are more populated in counties like Churchill, Elko, Lyon, Mineral, Pershing, Lander and Humboldt.

Nevada Pheasant Hunting

Pheasant hunting in Nevada takes place in areas of the state like farmlands, fields, brushes, edges and habitats that are semi populated.

Nevada Shooting Ranges

Some of the lost popular shooting ranges in Nevada open to the general public include the following:

  • Boulder Rifle & Pistol Club
  • Northeastern Nevada Rifle & Pistol Association
  • Washoe County Shooting Facility
  • Sage Hill Clay Sports
  • Perdiz Sport Shooting
  • Hawthorne Trap Club
  • Las Vegas Gun Club
  • Mason Valley Trap Club
  • Silver State Shooting Club
  • Spring Creek Trap & Skeet

Nevada Hunting Lands for Sale and Lease

Hunting lands for sale in Nevada include the following:

  • Elko, Nevada (Elko County) 2971.51 acres.
  • Deeth, Nevada (Elko County) 3,494 acres.
  • Wells, Nevada (Elko County) 40 acres.
  • Nevada Recreational Ranch Hunting Land for Sale in Northern Washoe County, 80 acres.
  • Wells, Nevada (Elko County) 47,737 acres.
  • Nevada Recreational Ranch Hunting Land for Sale in Northern Washoe County, 78.62 acres.
  • Gerlach, Nevada (Washoe County) 1378.09 acres.
  • Ely, Nevada (White Pine County) 80 acres.
  • Reno, Nevada (Washoe County) 80.5 acres.
  • Rochester, Nevada (Pershing County) 40 acres.
  • Wells, Nevada (Elko County) 10.17 acres.
  • Nevada Recreational Hunting Off-The-Grid Mountain Desert Land for Sale Battle Mountain, Nevada (Lander County) 20 acres.
  • Parcel on Emigrant Pass which is good Chuckar hunting Beowawe, Nevada (Eureka County) 55 acres.

Hunting lands for lease in Nevada Include the following:

  • Mule Deer, Quail, Predator, Exotics in Prime Pronghorn Grazing land, Pershing County, 40 acres.
The information provided on the Website is for general information purposes only and is not an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer. We may receive commissions from our partners when you click on some of the links. Learn More
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