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The Best

Eye Relief Scope

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Bestseller No. 1
Vortex Optics Crossfire II 2-7x32 Scout, Second Focal Plane,...
  • The 2-7x32 Crossfire II Scout Riflescope is perfect for Use...
  • With 9. 45" of eye relief and an ultra-forgiving eye box,...
  • Anti-reflective, fully multi-coated lenses provide bright...
  • Capped reset turrets are finger adjustable with MOA clicks...
Bestseller No. 2
PM3.5X40CB Prism Scope, Prismatic Rifle Scope, Long Eye...
  • Open Two eyes(wide angle enough you can open two eyes use...
  • Red/Green/Blue Illuminated
  • Precise 1/4 MOA Click Value for Windage and Elevation...
  • Compact Design with Built-in Double Side Rails and Integral...
ON SALE!Bestseller No. 3
UTG 2-7X32 1" Handgun Scope, Long Eye Relief, PDC Reticle
  • Built on true strength platform, completely sealed and...
  • UP to 25 inch of Eye relief allowing for effective Use on...
  • Projectile drop compensation reticle assists Shooting at...
Bestseller No. 4
Viiko Long Eye Relief Scope 1-5x24 LPVO Half Mildot Reticle...
  • Viiko 1-5x24 long eye relief Scope,SFP LPVO optics,1X to 5x...
  • Built for extremer and adventurers,Top glass quality with...
  • XC High Density Glass - Build with German Schott Glass for...
  • One piece 30mm tube constructed from 6066T6 aircraft grade...

Buyer's Guide: Eye Relief Scope

A Close Look At Eye Relief Scopes

If you have ever looked at a picture with an SLR camera, then you have experienced eye relief. The issue that you read about here is called optical eye relief. The optical area between your objective lens or eyepiece and the edge of your iris is called eye relief. When viewing a photo through any lens using improper eye relief, the entire scene you view will be magnified, either with an blurry image or with a blurry black circle around the center field of view.

The effect of poor eye relief on photographs can create an annoying distortion of the subject. For instance, if you were to look at a full-sized photograph printed on a heavy paper, say in gallery quality, you would notice that the subject's feet and legs appear to be several inches long. The illusion is created because the rays of light entering the camera lens are slightly bent when passing over your eye. This effect is called standard eye relief. Digital cameras use shorter optical paths which result in much less distortion of the subject.

How can you tell if you have adequate eye relief? First, know your resolution. The higher the resolution, the finer the resolution, generally the lower the distortion. A high resolution reticle will also produce a wider field of view because the light rays don't bend as much as they do with lower resolution. Also, a high quality scope will provide finer details at longer distances. Longer scopes will generally give you a larger image with fewer defects.

For general photography, the best scenario would be to have the camera on a tripod and let the scope adjust to a nice long eye movement. As you get more confident with your shots and you feel comfortable with the way the scope functions, you can increase the magnification until you are taking excellent shots without having to turn the scope up all the way. Remember that the objective is what makes a scope useful, so make sure you are focusing at the right eye dominate which in turn will produce a picture that comes out as sharp as possible. If you are not getting the results you desire simply increase the magnification and the results will come through in sharper images.

What causes scope bite? When a rifle is fired, there is some friction between the front sight and the rear sights. Scopes with low magnification have much less of this movement which results in a less severe scope bite. The bigger the scope, the less scope bite you'll experience. Some manufacturers name brands with larger scopes have much less scope bite, as well. If you find that you are frequently having issues with scope bite, it may be time to upgrade to a larger scope.

Another problem many new shooters face is having the scope "kickback". This is where the bullet begins to move back in the gun's direction after it exits the barrel. This can be avoided if the shooter uses a correct aim and has a strong grip on the rifle. If the shooter is using an iron, it is important to make sure that the scope is properly adjusted and mounted. Loose adjustments in the scope can lead to this problem and need to be fixed immediately.

Overall, these 5 negatives and one or two positives really highlight how tough the scope can be for some users. For the best results, be sure to try out a scope before purchasing it. Also, be sure to understand the limitations of the scope you're buying and understand that most users report having issues with the reticle and the ring around it. If you understand these limitations, you'll have more confidence when using the scope on your hunting trip.

Hopefully this article has given you a little background info on the scope you are about to buy and answered some questions that you might have had. The Eye Relief Scope is made for hunters who enjoy the long distance shots from the shotgun and for those who like to hunt from an elevated spot. It is definitely worth the money spent to purchase one for your firearm. But like any product, just make sure to do your research. Do not go into a purchase blind.