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Long Range Scopes

Handpicked
Quality-Checked
Generated From Real Reviews!
ON SALE!Rank 1
Burris Optics Fullfield E1 Riflescope 4.5-14x42mm, Matte...
  • High magnification extends your long-range shooting...
  • Features the Long Range MOA reticle, offering details and...
  • Trajectory-compensating technology and cascading dots to...
  • Designed for enthusiasts who want a simple, yet...
  • Ergonomic side focus allows easy-to-reach parallax...
Rank 2
Monstrum G2 6-24x50 First Focal Plane FFP Rifle Scope with...
  • High precision tactical rifle scope with 6-24x...
  • Functionally designed first focal plane rangefinder reticle,...
  • Equipped with an adjustable objective lens - or AO - that...
  • Touch-button controlled reticle illumination in both red and...
  • Package also includes set of high profile picatinny scope...
Rank 3
Sniper KT 12-60X60 SAL Long Range Rifle Scope 35mm Tube Side...
  • Side Parallax Adjustment
  • 35mm Tube Size
  • RG Illuminated Glass Etched Reticle
  • Capped reset turrets are finger adjustable with 1/8 MOA...
  • Nitrogen purged scope body, completely sealed with o-ring,...
Rank 4
Vortex Optics Venom 5-25x56 First Focal Plane Riflescope -...
  • The Venom 5-25x56 First Focal Plane (MOA) riflescope is...
  • XD Optical System delivers impressive resolution,...
  • The RevStop Zero System offers an easy to set, fast and...
  • EBR-7C reticle ensures subtensions are accurate throughout...
  • Nitrogen purged and o-ring sealed providing water and...
Rank 5
Ade Advanced Optics 6-25x56 35mm Long Range Rifle Scope...
  • Heavy duty one piece main tube provides the foundation for...
  • Extended-range tactical riflescope with 6-25x magnification...
  • Mil-DotBar reticle; precision controls with 140 MOA...
  • The use of water resistant sealants, synthetic grease and...
  • 35mm tube diameter; includes mounting rings; matte black...
Rank 6
Vortex Optics Golden Eagle HD 15-60x52 Second Focal Plane...
  • The Golden Eagle HD is specifically designed for competitive...
  • High density, apochromatic lens elements are index matched...
  • A side focus adjustment eliminates down range parallax. An...
  • A 30mm maintube machined from a single piece of aircraft...
  • O-ring sealed and argon purged, the Golden Eagle delivers...
  • Sport type: Hunting
ON SALE!Rank 7
Athlon Optics Athlon Midas TAC 6-24x50 APLR4 FFP MOA Reticle...
  • FFP with HD Glass and True Zero Stop
  • Advanced Fully Multi-coated
  • Capped Windage Turret
  • 10MIL/25MOA Travel-Per-Rotation Turrets
  • Field of View at 100yds: 17.8-4.6 ft
Rank 8
Burris Eliminator 4-16x50mm Laser Rangefinding Rifle Scope...
  • PRECISION SCOPE - Rely on the Eliminator to determine the...
  • MAKE HUNTING MORE EFFICIENT - Eliminate the extra variables...
  • LONG-DISTANCE RANGEFINDER - This laser rangefinder features...
  • LASERSCOPE TO INCREASE ACCURACY - With precision, this laser...
  • STATE-OF-THE-ART OPTICS - Count on the built-in inclinometer...
  • 25 feet at 100 yards (low) to 9 feet at 100 yards (high)...
  • 10.5 millimeters (low) to 3.5 millimeters (high) exit pupil
  • 50-Inch at 100 yards maximum adjust
  • 13-Inch long
  • Weighs 26 ounces
Rank 9
Vortex Optics Viper HS LR 6-24x50 First Focal Plane...
  • A subset of the Viper HS line, the Viper HS LR (Hunting &...
  • The XLR Reticle is a hashmarked MOA-based long range reticle...
  • In the advanced optical system, the XD glass renders an...
  • The HS LR offers exposed target-style elevation turrets for...
  • Ultra-hard, scratch resistant Armortek coatings protect the...
ON SALE!Rank 10
Burris 4.5 x-14 x -42mm Fullfield II Ballistic Plex Scope ,...
  • Popular and premium traditional hunting riflescope at an...
  • Quality, precision-ground lenses are larger than those of...
  • Durable, integrated-eyepiece design has no-slip grip for...
  • Durable, stress-free, solid 1-piece outer tube withstands...
  • Covered by the Burris Forever Warranty. We will repair or...
  • Fullfield II variable power 4.5x-14x-42mm matte black...
  • 1-piece tube construction, reinforced quad-seal gas seals...
  • Water, fog and shockproof
  • 1 inch tube, hunter turrets
  • Forever warranty

Buyer's Guide

Buyer's Guide: Long Range Scopes

Advertisements with a long-term scope can be misleading. Marketers will attempt to convince you to concentrate on the features that set them apart from their competition. This article will highlight the key features to consider when comparing long-range scopes. You will need to make compromises between the different features if you don't have $3,000+. If you have a limited budget, this list will help you understand the various specs and decide which features are most important to you. This list will help to filter out the marketing noise while researching scopes for rifles.

Most Important Features To Look For In Long-Range Riflescopes

Repeatable Adjustments and Return to Zero

While optical clarity is often the first priority, long-range accuracy should be. It would be ideal for dialing exactly 10.0 miles of elevation, not 10.05 or 99.99. Although there are many options to correct these errors, they can complicate an already complicated situation. It does not matter how many times you dial back; it still produces the same effect as before. The two most important things that will differentiate a low-end scope are repeatable turret adjustments and return to zero.

Milling Reticle

The milling reticle should have equal spacing dots (or hash marks) along both the horizontal and vertical axes. For long-range shooting, you must "hold for wind" as well as "dial for elevation." Dialing for elevations is when you calculate the drop or measure the distance to the target. Rotate the tripods of the scope to adjust for the drop. This will allow the crosshairs to be placed at the target's center as though they were 100 yards away. People "hold for wind" because of the speed at which the wind changes and their inability to adjust their scope quickly to fire the shot on time. Vertical fall is compensated for by the scope. Vertical fall can be compensated for by adjusting the scope. They can, however, keep the vertical axis in its center. They determine the adjustment needed for winds speeds of up to 10 mph. This adjustment can vary depending on how far they are traveling. It could take three miles. Just before they pull the trigger, the wind drops. They make a two-mill adjustment, and they hit the middle. They might not have hit their target if they had the original three mils. This diagram shows how "holding two mils" might look in this situation.

Below, only the horizontal axis marks are visible. Bullet Drop Compensation reticle features vertical axis markings. It doesn't make things easier to "hold for wind," however. This allows you "hold for elevation," something that's not often done with long-range shooting. Personally, I prefer finer marks using a floating crosshair such as the Nightforce MOARREticle.

Zoom Range/Power

You will need at minimum 18x to shoot long distances. You may not notice any difference in the range between 18-25. The zoom range at the lower end of the scope is crucial if you hunt with your rifle. A scope zooming in at just 8x will not be able to locate an animal within 50 feet. The ideal distance is between 5-25 meters.

The elevation adjustment range

Is the scope's internal adjustment range. It is easier to shoot long distances if the scope can adjust as much as possible. I prefer a scope with at least 100MOA (27.3 mm) elevation adjustment. You might need to adjust your ballistics by 55 MOA to get the shot you want. Your scope only allows for 50 MOA adjustments. Your scope will not allow you to adjust for elevation. The target will appear floating in the scope. These shots are not easy to obtain. A larger scope tube with a greater diameter can increase the accuracy of elevation adjustment. Scope tubes typically measure between 30mm to 34mm in diameter. The most common is 35mm. OpticsPlanet.com reports larger main tubes can be adjusted to transmit more light and reach higher elevations. Scopes with 30-mm tubes have the same lenses as scopes with 1-inch tubes.

Front Focal Plane

Although it is controversial, this feature is essential for long-range scopes. Reticles can be found on either the front focal or second plane. They can be found either in front or behind the scope's zoom. The zoom setting for front focal plane scopes can affect the size of the reticle. The reticle will shrink as you zoom in, but it will grow as you zoom out. This could be a sign that the reticle is too thick when zoomed in. This could also cause the target to be obscured. Front focal plane scopes have the advantage that all lines are at the same distance. The dots will always be at the same distance, no matter how zoomed you are in your scope. This is a crucial feature because it eliminates the need for you to think about one thing before taking long-range shots. The reticle size remains the same for second focal plane scopes. To get the right size marks, you must use a specific zoom setting. This is important to know before you take a shot. This setting is preferred by some people because it prevents problems with the reticles caused by thin or thick retinas.

High-quality glass

Sharp images produced by high-end scopes can look stunning in long-range scopes. The difference between a $200 scope or a $4000 scope is quality glass. This is particularly important when reading mirages. This is how you can determine the wind direction near your target. The wind direction at your target may be different from the one at the shooting site. Long-range shooting can cause this. Unfortunately, it's not possible to accurately assess the quality of scope glasses. This is subjective but can be seen easily when comparing scopes. This is an example showing my efforts to quantify optical clarity through double-blinding large scopes. Unfortunately, "Light Transmission" specifications do not include a standard testing procedure. Many manufacturers alter the system to make their products look better. Many scope manufacturers told me they would recommend that you ignore the specification. Compare the specifications to get the best results. It is worth choosing a glass manufacturer that uses high-quality glass if you don't have this luxury.

Matching Reticle or Torrents

Use the mil turret adjustments. These are typically one-tenth of a mil clicks. The MOA reticle must have turret adjustments at MOA (typically 1/4 MOAclicks). Mildot adjustment is an important feature on many scopes, especially those in the mid-and low-range. This feature is often not intuitive and can complicate things. It will let you see the bullet impact if they match. You can also measure the distance with the scope before you adjust it. You can use either one of these units to perform complex math or create a dope sheet. The MOA and mil systems have no inherent advantages (see the MIL comparison). Check that the reticle/turret adjustments can be used with either mil/Mil or MOA/MOA. Another argument is that MOA may be natural when you think in yards, while mils are natural if we think in meters.

Objective Size

A larger (56mm) objective lens will capture more light than a smaller (40mm). A higher objective lens will yield a lower return. If you have a focal length greater than 50mm, you won't notice any changes in the light levels. This is because you are using the most powerful setting. Hunting is a very specific sport, so it is important to hunt in low-light conditions (dusk or dawn). Mounting the scope low enough will ensure proper eye alignment. It is hard to align larger objective lenses without a stock that adjusts for cheek rest. At the same time, I prefer a 50mm lens, long-range shooters like 56mm objectives.

Other Features

Marketing will encourage you to focus more on other features like Zero Stop, Locking Turrets, and 1/8 MOA adjustments. These are only a few. These features are superior to other options. Zero Stop is a great feature for hunting situations that require long-range setups. 1/4 MOA adjustments are too small for me. These numbers are too small to be useful for most people. My scope does not have an illuminated red light. It's one of those things you love but never uses.

Final Words!

Do not pick extensions just because they look beautiful and whimsical.

FAQs

5

Additional Information

What do the numbers stand for on a scope?

There are two numbers that are required for rifle scope specifications. The first number indicates the magnification, while the second number indicates the diameter of your objective lens.

Do you put your eye on the scope of a rifle?

Let's wrap it up. Keep it simple. If your rifle is heavy in recoil, you can get even more eye relief.

How far can you see with a 3 9x40 scope?

The 3-9x40 scopes can be used for medium-range and close-range shooting, up to 200 yards. The 9x magnification makes it appear that a target is only 22-25 yards away when you scope it 200 yards away. You can hit all targets if you zero your scope properly.

How far back should a rifle scope be?

Depending on the scope and manufacturer, eye relief can vary from 2.5"" to nearly 5"". The magnification can affect eye relief. Some scopes have a constant distance, while others are shorter.

What range is a 4x32 scope Good For?

The reticle is set at 100 yards and can be extended to 600 yards. You can make precise shots on target quickly and easily with the reticle.

Optics

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