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The Best

Moa Scope

Handpicked
Quality-Checked
Bestseller No. 1
Burris Signature HD 3-15x44mm 1in Illuminated E3 MOA Tall...
  • The choice of either the Ballistic E3 Illuminated or Plex...
  • Built with a 1-inch nitrogen-filled tube and includes new...
  • 5x zoom system with premium, multi-coated glass for crisp,...
Bestseller No. 2
NightForce NXS 5.5-22x56mm Scope, ZeroStop .250 MOA...
  • BROAD MAGNIFICATION - 5.5-22 Nightforce NXS models provide a...
  • IDEAL FOR LARGE CALIBERS - The Nightforce NXS 5.5-22x56...
  • SLIM PROFILE - The slim profile of the NXS 5.5-22 x 56...
Bestseller No. 3
NightForce NXS C433 5.5-22x50mm ZeroStop SFP .250 MOA...
  • RETICLE ILLUMINATION - The scope is equipped with an...
  • FEATURES - Second Focal Plane; 30mm body tube diameter; 3.7...
  • NXS ANALOG ILLUMINATION - NXS 5.5-22x50 combines the...
Bestseller No. 4
NightForce NX8 4-32x50mm F1 Scope, 30mm Tube, First Focal...
  • NX8 SCOPE - This scope features ZeroStop and DigIllum...
  • VAST 4-32X MAGNIFICATION RANGE - At 32x you can zero in on...
  • MOAR RETICLE - The NightForce MOAR F1 reticle features 1 MOA...
Bestseller No. 5
Athlon Optics Athlon Midas TAC 6-24x50 APLR4 FFP MOA Reticle...
  • FFP with HD Glass and True Zero Stop
  • Advanced Fully Multi-coated
  • Capped Windage Turret
Bestseller No. 6
NightForce NX8 1-8x24 F1 Scope w/Zerostop, PTL, 30mm Tube, 5...
  • NX8 1-8X24 F1 SCOPE - is a class leading, compact and...
  • HIGH PERFORMANCE AND RELIABILITY - At only 8.75" in length...
  • LONG SHOTS - For those preferring to dial for long shots,...
Bestseller No. 7
Monstrum G3 8-32x56 First Focal Plane FFP Rifle Scope with...
  • High performance tactical rifle scope with 8-32x...
  • Functionally designed first focal plane MOA reticle, with...
  • Equipped with a parallax adjustment dial that allows for...

Buyer's Guide: Moa Scope

How to Properly Use a MOA Turret Or MOA Scope

The MAA (Maine Association of Railroads) was the first organization to create a national standard for measuring the distance of a given trail. In 1844, the first version of the MAA surveyor's format called the MAA grid was created. A more recent measure called the MAA yard line was introduced in 1970. These two measurements are intended for use along a rail road in order to measure the distances from one point to the next and from one yard line to the next. They are not however the only measurements available to railroad engineers or designers.

The MAA defines a yard as any point on a trail that is equal to the angle the observer is facing at the moment of measurement. Any angle other than a straight line is considered to be a measurement error. An excellent railroader will measure angles of both a straight and a curved route and adjust his or her equipment accordingly. An excellent way to test the performance of your equipment is to set your mare for a full yard and then back it up several times without using the controls. If the angle you are seeing is more than a degree of angle from the true setting, this may indicate that you are off setting your equipment.

The MAA definition of one revolution is when the equipment has traveled twelve moa since it began its last revolution. This makes a "full revolution" a measurement that includes all twelve inches of the trail. This is the recommended definition of a revolution because you are measuring how far the trail has moved since the last measurement. Many railroads, including the Maine Highways, have adopted the one revolution rule and make allowances for minor variations between measurements taken at different times.

The MAA Yard Line, which is the actual distance between points, is an easy way to measure short changes in distance. However, the yard line is only one of the many measurements that may be necessary to determine whether the shot is a long or a short range shot. The MAA definition of one revolution is when the shot has traveled twelve inches since it began its last revolution. This is the recommended definition of a revolution, since you are measuring how far the shot has moved since the last measurement.

In measuring yardage, you must use the proper yardstick, which is the actual distance between markers on the ground, and not the markers on the line used by the MAA. The MAA definition of one revolution is when the shot has traveled twelve inches since the last measurement. This is the recommended definition of a revolution, since you are measuring how far the shot has moved since the last measurement. There are a number of other factors involved when determining the distance that a shot has traveled. The main factors are the height of the object and the speed of the object.

The next factor, which is an angular measurement, is commonly referred to as the bullet drop or the bullet deflection, which will affect the penetration capability of the round. To compensate for this factor, you need to measure the distance between the center of the grouping and the center of the target. This will calculate the distance that the bullet must travel, and adjust the elevation accordingly. Another factor, which affects the accuracy of your mainshooting, is the wind. The wind affects the trajectory of the bullet, and it can cause the bullet to jump off target.

Some shooters like to shoot from an elevated location, such as in an elevated tree branch. They feel that this helps them compensate for the bullet drop. However, this only works if you are shooting from a location where the wind is blowing parallel to your target line. If the wind is blowing at an angle to your target line, then you are not compensating for the bullet drop. Your elevation will compensate for the bullet drop, but not the angle of the trajectory.

After shooting a few rounds with your newly adjusted, zeroed in azimuths, the next step is to move the grid to its appropriate locations on the elevation dial and zero the knobs. If you are using the elevation knob to control windage, make sure you have the grid aligned with the knob. The grid, when aligned, should point to the right or left and not to the left or right. Using these tips will help any hunter or shot hunter who is using aMOA orMOA Turret to consistently hit their targets.