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Ohio Open Carry: Laws, Requirements, Application & Online Training

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Ohio State allows the use of guns in its territory.

However, there are location restrictions for the possession of firearms that you must obey.

For Ohio open carry, you must be familiar with gun laws related to the practice in terms of how to carry and where to carry.

Ohio Gun Laws Summary

Ohio issues concealed weapons licenses for the possession of firearms in the state.

The sheriff’s office in a local county is in charge of the permit application, and the state has a shall-issue policy.

The state does not issue purchase permits for firearms, but if you are buying from a federally or state-licensed dealer and you do not have a concealed firearm license, you must complete a criminal record background check.

You must be at least twenty-one years old to apply for the state concealed firearm permit.

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Is Open Carry Legal In Ohio?

Yes. Adults who are eighteen years old or more can open carry in Ohio as long as they do not have any state or federal restriction to do so.

Open Carry Laws In Ohio

Ohio is a permissive open carry state, and as long as you have a permit, you can open carry within the state territory.

The state prohibits firearms automatic or semi-automatic firearms and any other similar gun.

It is a crime to possess, buy, or sell any of these firearms in the state.

Ohio Open Gun Laws Quick View

Law/PolicyLong GunsHandgunsComments
State permit for open carry.NoNoNo, you do not need a permit to open carry in Ohio.
Firearm registrations for open carry.NoNpThere are no requirements to register firearms for open carry in Ohio.
Assault weapon for open carry.NoNoOhio prohibits the possession and manufacturing of assault firearms in the state.
Magazine limitNoNoThere is no magazine limit for firearms in the state.
License for the owner of a firearm.Not requiredNot requiredThere are no requirements to own a license for firearms in the state.
Red flag lawNoNoOhio gun laws do not say anything about red flag law or issuing extreme risk protection orders in the state.
Castle doctrine lawYesYesOhio is a castle doctrine state, and you can stand your ground in your home of residence and private car.
Background check for private dealersNoNoA background check is not compulsory for private firearm dealers in the state.
PreemptionYesYesOhio is a preemption gun law state, with the state government statues superseding local ordinances. However, local governments can regulate the discharge of firearms in their boundaries.
Concealed carry permit.NoYesYou need a concealed handgun permit to conceal carry within the territory of Ohio.
Concealed carry in personal vehicleNoYesYou can conceal carry in your vehicle as long as you are with your license
Open carry in SchoolsNoNoOpen carry of firearms or weapons is not allowed in schools, colleges, and their facilities.

Where Is It Legal To Open Carry In Ohio?

Ohio permits open carry and the use of firearms in the following areas of the state:

  • Restaurants and Bars: You can open carry in restaurants areas alone.
  • Roadside areas: You can open carry in roadside areas of Ohio.
  • State forests and Parks: You can open carry in forests, parks, and wildlife management areas in the state.

Where Is It Illegal To Open Carry In Ohio?

Ohio prohibits open carry and the possession of firearms in the following parts of the state:

  • Schools: You cannot open carry within school premises, including colleges and universities, or any property owned or used by the schools for their activities.
  • Daycare: You cannot open carry in daycare centers or any facility for holding children.
  • Police station: You cannot open carry in police stations, state patrol stations, local sheriff’s offices, or any other place under the jurisdiction of the state Bureau of Criminal Investigation.
  • Courthouse: You cannot open carry in any courthouse of the state or a courtroom during proceedings.
  • State capitol area: You cannot open carry in state capitol buildings or its premises.
  • Prisons: You cannot open carry in any Ohio state prison, jail, correctional home, or detention facility.
  • Airport areas: You cannot open carry in safety zones of airport areas in the state.
  • Mental homes: You cannot open carry in institutions meant for psychiatric treatment or training mentally unfit people.
  • Bars: You cannot open carry in bars, or any place where the consumption of alcohol is on-site, and while under the influence of alcohol.
  • Places of worship: You cannot open carry or possess firearms in mosques, churches, and synagogue except you have permission from those in charge to do so.
  • Private property: You cannot open carry in any private property, including buildings or cars if the owner prohibits possession of firearms.
  • Government buildings: You cannot open carry in any building owned by the state government.
  • Prohibited paces: You cannot open carry in any part of the state where federal laws prohibit the possession of firearms.

FAQs About Open Carry Ohio

Some of the most frequently asked questions about open carry in Ohio include the following:

Do I Need A Permit To Open Carry In Ohio?

No. Ohio does not issue any permit or license to open carry in the state.

Do I Need A Permit For Concealed Carry In Ohio?

Yes. To concealed carry in Ohio, you must have the state concealed handgun license.

What Is The Minimum Age Requirement For Open Carry In Ohio?

You must be at least eighteen years old before you open carry in Ohio.

What Is The Minimum Age Requirement For Concealed Carry In Ohio?

You must be twenty-one years old or more before you conceal carry in Ohio.

At What Age Can I Apply For Ohio Concealed Handgun License?

To obtain an Ohio handgun license in the state, you must be at least twenty-one years old.

Does Ohio Have Red Flag Law In The State?

No. The state gun statute does not mention red flag law or the issuance of an extreme risk protection order.

Can Non-residents Apply For Ohio Concealed Handgun License?

Only non-residents employed in Ohio can apply for the state handgun license.

Since Ohio honors permits from every other state in the USA, you can use your state permit to conceal carry in Ohio.

Does Ohio Allow Constitutional Carry In The State?

No. Ohio does not permit constitutional carry

Can I Open Carry Knives In Ohio?

Yes, you can possess and open carry every type of knives in Ohio, except ballistic knives.

However, you cannot possess knives in restricted areas of the state like in schools and courthouses.

Also, state municipalities have the power to regulate the use of knives, like Cleveland, that bans the use of knives with blades more than two and a half inches.

Can I Conceal Carry Knives In Ohio?

It is unlawful to conceal carry knives or any other type of dangerous weapon in the state. This includes steak knives and pocket knives.

Does Ohio Restrict Some Types Of Firearms In The State?

Yes, the state has a dangerous ordinance for automatic firearms, shotguns, rifles with short barrels, crude guns, or any other type of weapon designed to be like that.

Do I Need A Purchase Permit To Buy Firearms In Ohio?

No. The state does not issue a purchase permit to buy firearms.

Is NICS Criminal Record Background Check Compulsory For Firearm Purchase In Ohio?

Yes, if you are buying from a state or federally licensed seller, then you must complete the criminal record background check.

However, the state does not subject private firearms dealers to this check.

Also, if you have a concealed firearm license issued after the twenty-third of march twenty-thirteen, you do not need to undergo the background check.

For How Long Is Ohio License To Carry Valid In The State?

Ohio concealed firearm license is valid for a period of five years, after which you have to apply for a renewal permit.

Am I Obligated To Inform A Law Enforcement Officer About My Possession Of Firearms In Ohio?

Yes, you must inform the police or any law enforcement officer you come in contact with about your possession of a firearm.

If you are in a vehicle, you must keep your hand in sight and not have contact with your firearm.

Is Ohio A Castle Doctrine State?

Ohio castle doctrine took effect on March twenty-eight twenty-nineteen, and you do not have a duty to retreat when you are in your dwelling place or private car.

Can I Use Deadly Force In Ohio?

You can only make use of deadly force while carrying out your self-defense right.

The state permits deadly force if you think that an attack can lead to severe bodily harm or imminent death.

Is It Compulsory To Carry Out Firearm Training Before Applying For Ohio Concealed Weapon License?

Yes, you must complete a training course of at least eight hours’ duration with two hours for a live-fire session.

The training must be a state-approved one with a certified instructor in charge.

Is Registration Of Firearms A Requirement In Ohio?

No. Ohio state gun statutes do not say anything about the registration of firearms.

Relevant Open Carry Laws And Legislature In Ohio

Some of Ohio gun laws relating to open carry in the state that you just know include the following.

No Weapon Sign

Ohio enforces the no weapon sign in the state.

Anybody that owns or controls a property, be it by leasing or renting in Ohio or any other subdivision of the state, may post a sign on the property prohibiting the possession of firearms within it.

If a person deliberately violates such a post, then he or she is guilty of trespass and a misdemeanor of the fourth degree.

If a person violates such a post is a parking space or any other parking area in the state, the person faces civil action for trespass.

If a person violates such post or any prohibition against carrying firearms in daycare or any children care facility, the person will be guilty of aggravated trespass. The only exception is a permit owner that lives in the building.

Even with a valid permit to carry issued by Ohio, nobody shall open carry in any restricted areas.

Preemption Laws

The Ohio state government preempts gun laws in the state, with authority to regulate the use of firearms in any of the state jurisdictions.

However, Municipalities and local governments can restrict the shooting of firearms within their local areas.

In the case that local ordinance conflicts with Ohio state government gun laws, affected residents can bring up civil suits against such local areas.

Brandishing Of Firearms In Ohio

Ohio prohibits the illegal usage of firearms in the state.

Nobody shall deliberately cause apprehension or fear of physical harm in another person with a firearm.

Also, nobody shall, under rage, use any deadly force on another person or attempt to injure another person with a firearm or any deadly weapon.

The only exception to this is the lawful usage of firearms or while exercising self-defense rights in the state.

Possession Of Firearms Under The Influence Of Alcohol

It is a crime to make use of firearms while under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or any other intoxicating substance in the state.

Open Carry While Hunting In Ohio

Open carry while hunting in Ohio is legal except during archery hunting, where only concealed carry is lawful.

However, even with concealed carry while bow hunting, you must not use the firearm to take down a game.

Ohio has hunter harassment laws in the state.

Nobody shall deliberately prevent a legal hunting activity, and this includes trapping and fishing, in any of the following ways:

  • Putting his or herself in a place where he or she knows that the presence can have an impact on the behavior of games or wildlife, making it difficult for the hunter to capture them.
  • Create any form of stimuli that will affect the games and the possibility of capturing them.
  • Have an impact on the property or location used for hunting, fishing, or trapping animals.
  • These hunter harassment laws apply to only land or water areas licensed for hunting activities to take place in Ohio.
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