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The Best

Handgun Sights

Handpicked
Quality-Checked
ON SALE!Bestseller No. 1
Crimson Trace CTS-1550 Ultra Compact Open Reflex Pistol...
  • DIMENSIONS: 1.7" L x 1" W x 1" D with a weight of .65 ounces
  • RUNTIME: 20,000 hours (2 years) of battery life that runs on...
  • EASE OF USE: Get the perfect brightness with the built-in...
Bestseller No. 2
Vortex Optics Viper Red Dot Sight - 6 MOA Dot , black
  • The Viper Red Dot Sight has a super low-profile making it...
  • The Viper's low height allows it to co-witness with iron...
  • The fully multi-coated, ultra-clear lens offers a wide,...
ON SALE!Bestseller No. 3
TRUGLO Tritium Handgun Glow-in-the-Dark Night Sights for...
  • Fits Glock 17 / 17L, 19, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 33, 34, 35, 38,...
  • Tritium night sights transition from standard white dot...
  • Utilizes quality Swiss tritium for maximum brightness and...
Bestseller No. 4
Tactical RMR Red Dot Sight,20mm Mount Pistol Handgun...
  • ◆Illumination Source: LED red dot sight
  • ◆Length (In): 45mm illumination reflex sight
  • ◆Adjustment @ 100 yards (clicks/in) :1.0 Red dot optics...
ON SALE!Bestseller No. 5
TRUGLO TFX Pro Tritium and Fiber Optic Xtreme Hangun Sights...
  • Contrasting colored front sight ring for even faster focus
  • Quick and accurate U-notch Design
  • Angled rear sight edge for emergency one-hand operation
ON SALE!Bestseller No. 6
Gmconn Mini Tactical Green Laser Sights Ultra Low Profile...
  • ✅【ONLY ONE Screw + 21MM Width Rail】There are Three...
  • ✅【Class IIIA, <5mW】Bright and precision green laser...
  • ✅【User Friendly】Easy ambidextrous activation for left...
Bestseller No. 7
Pistol Light Laser Sight Gun Light Picatinny Weaver Rail...
  • Convenient magnetic charging design- Our laser sights for...
  • Bright and clear LED picatinny flashlight, max 450 lumens-...
  • Flexible adjustability to adapt to various gun and pistol...

Buyer's Guide: Handgun Sights

The Importance of Selecting Handgun Sights

Typically, most pistol sights include a large round red rear sight and a larger round red front sight. This configuration is fairly easy to align. However, most handguns are first sighted at a distance of 50 yards. A "ring sight" is used in this situation.

Most handgun sights now have a rubber or plastic sleeve surrounding the tube. The purpose of this is to prevent dirt or dust from entering the sighting system. A small amount of oil is added to the lubricant to help prevent sticking and to improve accuracy. In recent years, most shooters have been issued ammo with increased quantities of o-rings to help insure proper alignment at all times.

Both a front-loading and a bolt-action handgun is equipped with sights that are fixed with the rest of the gun. A front-loading gun has a front sight that opens as the bullet is shot and then manually shuts after the round is fired. The bolt action sight, on the other hand, is a bit different. It usually features an open sight mechanism that allows a finger to operate the bolt and close the sight.

Both types of handguns require a target to be aligned with when shooting. This is called a shooting target. For pistols, this is usually done using a small fixed blade called a target collar. For more effective training, however, training targets can be mounted on handguns. These should be made of metal or plastic and are not easily damaged by too much handling or firing.

One important aspect to consider in training with handguns is target identification. This involves identifying the individual blinks who is valid shooting targets for a given handgun. Using red laser pointers during training helps improve target identification.

There are two major styles of handgun sights used in training: iron sights and night sights. Iron sights consist of an outer barrel with an iron sight or bright lamp attached to the inside of the barrel. The advantage of iron sights is that they offer the user a fast and reliable reference point when aiming at the target. Iron sights also tend to make cross-fire prone shots difficult.

Night sights, also known as laser sights or tritium sights, consist of a small laser emitting light diagonally from the base of the unit above the target. Most night sights are adjustable but because they are powered by a small electrical current, they tend to be more expensive than iron sights. They also tend to be less accurate than iron sights during low light shooting. Tritium sights work through a combination of heat and radiation. Because tritium lights are visible under low light, they are often used for training in the dark.

Both iron sights and night sights use tritium lights to help target identification. However, iron sights use a moving object for aiming whereas night sights use an invisible aiming point. This allows for a more consistent aiming point and more stability in recoil. Tritium sights also work better under low light conditions. For these reasons, tritium sights are the preferred rangefinder type on a personal shooting gun.

Fiber-optic sights are another type of rangefinder that uses fiber optic technology to provide a clearer image. Unlike tritium, fiber-optic sights use a continuous loop of fiber optic cables rather than photoresistors to detect target movement. The main difference between the two is that while tritium uses a molecule of triton to create an electric field that changes when electrons pass through the ionized surface, fiber-optic uses light to create this electric field. The resulting electric fields are stronger and longer lasting than what is found in triton.

Handgun Sight Alignment Another important factor to consider when purchasing a hand gun is the overall accuracy of the gun's sighting. There are many different criteria that can be used to measure overall accuracy. One of the most common is an "A" line from left to right eye in a pistol shooting or right to left in a rifle shooting. However, these measurements can be extremely difficult to apply to certain situations. For example, many pistols require a shooter to allow for wind effects, which can cause left eye sightings at shorter ranges than what is necessary for rifle shots.

Handgun Sights On the topic of hand gun accuracy, many shooters focus on the windage when determining where the target will be hit. However, some handguns require sights to be adjusted for wind. Some shooters believe that this makes the handguns more prone to "practice syndrome", which involves repeating shooting until a consistent hit is achieved. To counter this, shooters should not adjust their sight levels to account for wind conditions, but only to the accuracy of the individual shot. This is especially important when choosing handgun sights for long shots, since the wind can cause the trajectory of long shots to deviate from a straight trajectory.

Laser Sights Although laser sights are often associated with high end pistol models, they are widely used in all different types of hand gun. For example, they are used in handgun training as well as in the Air Force and police force. They work by using a red dot to illuminate the target, much like the laser pointer. Because they use a low level of laser energy, they are very accurate, even at distances as far as fifteen feet. Some models can even provide the same results as a fully loaded Ruger rifle, which further emphasizes the value of using a laser sight for both practice and hunting.