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The Best

Thermal Spotting Scope

Handpicked
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ON SALE!Bestseller No. 1
FLIR Scout TK Handheld Thermal Imaging Monocular Green, 6.0"...
  • FLIR Scout TK makes outdoor thermal imaging more accessible...
  • Pocket-sized and designed for single-handed use, FLIR Scout...
  • The Scout TK is also a great everyday tool for personal and...
  • Package Includes: Handheld Thermal Camera,Neck Lanyard, USB...
ON SALE!Bestseller No. 2
ATN Thor LT Thermal Rifle Scope w/10+hrs Battery & Ultra-Low...
  • Affordable price for a quality thermal scope is possible. We...
  • Advanced heat detection sensors allow you to see in total...
  • Enjoy traditional design: 30mm tube scope made of hardened...
  • Maximum performance with minimum power consumption (internal...
Bestseller No. 3
FLIR Breach PTQ136 Multi-Purpose Thermal Imaging Monocular
  • EXCEPTIONAL VISION: The advanced image processing of the...
  • CONVENIENT HANDS-FREE OPERATION: For hands-free operation,...
  • SUPERIOR VALUE: Document operations with on-board video...
  • INTERNAL MEMORY: Up to 1,000 images and 2.5 hours of video...
ON SALE!Bestseller No. 4
ATN ThOR 4 1.25-5x, 384x288, Thermal Rifle Scope w/Ultra...
  • Ultra Sensitive Next Gen Sensor - Is capable of capturing...
  • Ballistic Calculator- Hunt responsibly by making sure your...
  • Dual Stream Video Recording - You asked and we listened ThOR...
  • RAV (Recoil Activated Video) - Recoil Activated Video (RAV)...

Buyer's Guide: Thermal Spotting Scope

Thermal Spotting Scope - How to Use a Thermal Spotting Scope For Tactical Applications

You might want to give consideration to buying a thermal spotting scope if you're hunting for big cats or other game that's hard to spot using other scopes. This is a great idea, especially if you often hunt in such places where you can't always rely on your rifle's optics. While you'll still need a rifle of some sort to carry your gun, a spotting scope can be an invaluable tool for spotting animals when you're not carrying a gun. Here's why.

There are many types of scopes out there, each with different functions. Some are designed for long range shots while others are better for spotting animals that are close to you. Thermal scopes are ideal for hunting both big cats and small game. So if you're a hunter who hunters in more remote areas which has plenty of brush and cover (such as thickets and thick grasses), then you'll really love thermal pictures.

But beware, thermal imaging scopes do cost quite a bit, going well beyond the $2,500 price range. For that price, you get more than just a spotter, you get thermal weapon sights. These are much more advanced than spotting scope technology, and allow you to see far infrared temperatures. These readings can be very telling, because the greater the temperature difference between the sun and the heat of your target, the closer your animal will be. That's why a handheld thermal scope allows you to see even the remotest edges of your animal's hide.

The way a handheld thermal imaging scope works is simple. First of all, the user inserts a device called a probe into the animal's skin. Next, a laser, or some other emitted light, projects images of thermal flir imaging onto the device's sensor surface. This probe can go in any number of directions, up, down, left or right. The device is designed in a way to give you a three-dimensional image, so you can see not only the animal's head, but also the entire body below the eyes.

Now you've probably noticed that this is a whole lot different than the typical rifle scope. While a typical rifle scope can only work with certain guns (for example, only nitrogen-filled air rifles work with nitrogen-filled rifles, while magnetic-optic devices work with all types of guns). The thermal scope can be used with almost any gun, as long as it has the right sensor. It also can work with nearly any rifle, although a majority of these rifles work better with long-range shots over short distances. Also, the thermal scope doesn't have its own battery, although there are battery-operated, solar-powered versions available.

The main reason behind this leap in capability is because these devices rely on an image-intensifier tube to provide a clear picture. Image-intensifiers vary according to what type of light is being used in the scope; therefore, these scopes will only function at night when the light is strong enough and visible. A typical night vision scope has an image-intensifier tube that runs from the handheld unit all the way up to the scope itself. These tubes are often attached to the weapon in one of two ways: either via a hole in the side of the weapon, or through a connector pin that attaches the tube directly to the rifle's grip.

The image-intensifier tube functions to send electrons to the solar cells that power the night vision unit. These electrons travel from the solar cell up into the image-intensifier tube, where they collide with photons that are emitted by the target. This process causes electrons to be released, creating a very sharp image.

Night vision has improved greatly over the years, but there are still many military and tactical situations in which it makes more sense to use a thermal scope. For example, many thermal rifle scopes can be adjusted for different distances. For long shots, you might want to increase the distance, whereas for closer targets, you might want to decrease it. This feature is also helpful when using a night-vision device on an airsoft gun. The reticles can be adjusted so that the crosshairs can be located at a distance that is ideal for hitting a moving target.